Gaund ke Laddu - Panjiri

, , 27 comments

gaund laddu


Boy! Time has been racing real fast and I wish to hold it in hand. It's been now close to two months since a little angel came into our lives. It felt just the other day when she was born and now she's already 2 months old. From her deciphering cries to toothless gummy smiles, from her weaker neck to a now steadier head, I see her changing with every passing day. She's growing big at a rapid pace, it's a learning phase for both, her and me, an experience I shall always cherish.

gaund laddu gaund laddu


As I watch my little one grow, I'm amazed to see how she expresses herself through her coos, lip smacks and jerky arm and leg movements. She loves to throw her hands up in air and cycles her feet hard. Her energy levels are high and infectious and can tire the most active ones too!

She's expressive, loves experimenting with different facial expressions — pouting her lips, raising her eyebrows, widening her eyes and furrowing her brow. She enjoys being a part of crowd, loves to be cuddled, hugged and pampered. I guess she recognizes me well now. I don't exactly remember when she smiled first, but she smiles more often now and rewards me with beaming, toothless grins and that makes up for all the sleep deprived nights I have been through. It's magical.

gaund laddu gaund laddu


In the past two months, my life has changed by leaps and bounds. Along with her birth, came shoulders of responsibility for my mother too. She's stressed by the new demands of having a baby in the house as she holds dual responsibility... both for me and my baby. Primarily my food concerns her the most, since as a lactating mother, traditionally there's a diet pattern to be followed and she takes care of those needs. The recipe I post here today comes from my mother which she made specifically for my nursing period.

Gaund ke Laddu or Panjiri is a popular North Indian sweet made from whole wheat flour and edible gum fried in clarified butter, heavily laced with almonds. Gaund is an edible gum extracted from the bark of a tree and is known to provide heat to our body, hence usually consumed in the winters. Panjiri is normally given to nursing mothers as it helps in increasing the body heat, hence assist in the production of breast milk.

gaund laddu


Gaund ke Laddu - Panjiri

INGREDIENTS

1 cup whole wheat flour
1 1/4 cup powdered sugar
1 cup clarified butter (ghee)
3/4 cup coarsely chopped almonds
1/2 cup Gaund (edible gum)
1/2 cup puffed lotus seed (makhana)
1/2 cup khus khus (poppy seeds)
1 tsp powder ajwain (carom seed)
1 tsp dry ginger powder

gaund laddu


DIRECTIONS

In the frying pan, add a tablespoon of ghee and fry the chopped makhana for few minutes till they become crisp. Don't let them brown too much. Mix in the khus khus and set aside. Heat 2 tablespoons ghee in the same frying pan and fry gaund. Gaund comes in form of yellow translucent crystals of varying sizes. Hence the amount of ghee required to fry them will depend on the size. If you think they haven't cooked well, add in more ghee. Fry them until they puff up like popcorn. Crush them with hand or in a food processor. Set aside.

In same frying pan, add the remaining ghee and fry whole wheat flour on low flame till it is aromatic and has changed it's color slightly. Add in the chopped almonds, ajwain and ginger powder to the fried flour and stir fry for another 10 minutes. Stir the mixture continuously to prevent burning.

Add the remaining fried ingredients, the gaund, khus khus and makhana to the flour mixture. Mix it well and roast for another few minutes. Remove from the heat and immediately add in the powdered sugar and mix the entire stuff well quickly. Shape them into laddus while the mixture is hot or serve as is. Store them in an air tight container. Since there is no water content, these laddus will stay fresh for long.

gaund laddu


The makhana and the gaund here is deep fried in ghee and then added to the dish. However you can try roasting them with lesser amount of fat to cut down on those unwanted calories. My mother substituted khus khus in place of melon seeds which are traditionally used.

These delicious gaund laddus are rich in taste and may sound heavy on calories, but who cares? I'm going through 'once a lifetime' phase and during this period I am pampered for a festive indulgence. I relish this traditional winter delicacy with a glass of warm milk for breakfast. They make up for a great dessert too.

27 comments:

  1. So healthy and prefect looking laddoos,feel like gobbing some..

    ReplyDelete
  2. Wow.. Inviting ones.. yummy..

    ReplyDelete
  3. Its indeed both magical and extremely draining to look after a new born. Of course the new Mom's Mom will be as drained having to do so many things!

    We make this laddoo in a slightly different way its absolutely yumm! Love the crunch of the gaund crystals with the nuts and coconut that's added in our version. This sounds yumm too!

    ReplyDelete
  4. I remember eating so many of these laddoos after my delivery...they used to taste so good..I wish I can pick one from your bowl and eat it.
    Kids grow really fast...it seems as if before few months only I was eating these ladoos and now with the blink of eye my daughter is 5 yrs old :)
    Enjoy this lovely bonding time with ur daughter.

    ReplyDelete
  5. i can eat ur ladoo completely without even moving a bit and not even sharing one - ladoo lover
    AH kids in house...i hear stories form my mom and sis...enjoy lady it is the time :)

    ReplyDelete
  6. I remember eating these laddos everyday after my son was born and they were really addictive..how I wish I can grab one from the screen right now and indugle myself..simply irresistible laddoos...
    Enjoy your time with your little one..they grow up very fast..take care!

    ReplyDelete
  7. HI
    Thanks for so quick comment in my blog,
    This is very common chutney recipe by adding or skipping few ingredients, however the mango chutney tastes great right? :-)

    ReplyDelete
  8. first time at you blog....you got a lovely space...love the layout of your blog...and the yummy treats :):)will be here more often

    ReplyDelete
  9. So nice to hear abt ur lil one! They grow up fast too... i had these laddus from my friend's lunch box recently and they were so yummy! I never knew we could make laddus with gondh. In fact, gondh is commonly burnt and used as an incense in Kerala and also in our churches. It's also called frankincense. I love its fragrance and now I am amazed by how wonderful these laddus are. Thanks for the recipe. Will be trying it out :)

    ReplyDelete
  10. This is not fair !! these mind blowing ladoos are not allowing me to read your post !! after my pregnancy i allowed myself to indulge in these rich ladoos. You have made them perfectly.
    Do enjoy your new role as mother. As time flies like anything......

    Deepa
    Hamaree Rasoi

    ReplyDelete
  11. Ladoos looks divine..never tried with wheat flour,will surely give this a try
    Loved your space,wonderful recipes..Happy following u:)

    ReplyDelete
  12. These laddos look fantastic, esp. the first photograph. I remember seeing my mom make these in large numbers for my elder sister during her nursing period. She would love to eat many of these with milk for her breakfast. I too used to enjoy them then, though they were not meant for me. I remember how delicious they were even today and crave for some. The recipe is a keeper for the ones who know how wonderful these laddus are. Thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
  13. Yummy Ladoos..looks v tempting and delicious!

    ReplyDelete
  14. delicious looking flavourful ladoos

    ReplyDelete
  15. Awww, your little one sounds so sweet.
    And your laddoos look delicious - nice photographs and styling.

    ReplyDelete
  16. I have been looking for this recipe from long time, tasted once when my colleague got these laddu from home and I was hooked! Thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
  17. How did I miss this post?! These laddus look very tempting though am hearing this for he first time....

    ReplyDelete
  18. i had these ladoos for nearly 2 mths after my delivery ...and to b very frank i can eat them anytime..my mom in law makes it just like ur mom but she adds 2-3 ingredients more..luved the clicks !

    ReplyDelete
  19. they are really delicious . m having in my 9th month . is that okay to eat before delivery or not? a bit confused

    ReplyDelete
  20. This is generally given to nursing mothers, but then its surely okay to eat before delivery too!

    ReplyDelete
  21. How many calories in panjiri ladoo with all nuts?

    ReplyDelete
  22. Your panjiri ladoos recipe is awesome, But I loved the way you expressed your feeling being a new mom of a two month baby. My baby is now 3 months old and feeling the same as you mentioned...:) enjoying his activities a lot.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Your panjiri ladoos recipe is awesome, But I loved the way you expressed your feeling being a new mom of a two month baby. My baby is now 3 months old and feeling the same as you mentioned...:) enjoying his activities a lot.

    ReplyDelete
  24. Do you make these with kamarkas, too. If so, how much do I add, and when do I add, and how do I add it? Does it help with back pain?

    ReplyDelete
  25. Can these be consumed in the summer season

    ReplyDelete
  26. Can these be eaten in the summer season

    ReplyDelete
  27. Lovely post! Full of information about your flavourful recipes :)
    Thanks very much for sharing!
    Restaurant in Karol Bagh

    ReplyDelete